Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the bill, 111 democrats voted against it. not only will the no budget, no pay act suspend the debt ceiling for about three months, it also requires the house and senate to pass budget resolutions by april 15th, and if they don't, representatives and senators will not get paid, which is of course, wildly unconstitutional. the 27th amendment prohibits congress from modifying their own paychecks in any way. they can vote to change the pay for future congress only, but republicans passing an unconstitutional bill, while at the same time relieving the pressure on the debt ceiling was welcomed by some democrats as republicans moving from out-right crazy to half-crazy. >> i'm not sure what happened at the house republican retreat last week, but it sure had a mellowing effect on their members. maybe there were deep breathing exercises, soft jazz music. something happened. either way, we welcomed the outcome of their retreat. the bill represents a huge change on the debt ceiling issue, and hands the president his second major win in a month. and it shows that the republicans are in full-on retreat
it to sound reassuring to conservatives, like that is fine, we don't need the debt ceiling, we have the big spending cuts, democrats will never allow those. i can't see why they're reassured. to see this as a deal, you have to remember where they were when they created the cuts in the first place, back in the 2011 fight. the way we got out of that mess, we kicked the can down the road and formed the super committee. you remember the super committee, the bipartisan group of legislators are charged with finding 1.2 trillion in deficit reduction, that was plan b to the super committee, if they failed, which they did, the sequester would cut the deficit by the same 1.2 trillion, but it would do it right away, and in such a mindless, painful dumb way that neither party could live with it. it was meant, then to force the parties to make the deal. punishment. and that was an obvious design, you build half the sequester out of tax increases, which republicans hate, and then the other out of spending cuts which democrats hate. but republicans refused to vote for anything with taxes in it. even thoug
raised the debt ceiling, it would be $1 for spending cuts for every dollar in debt ceiling raised. that is not what you got this time. and you have put the focus on senate democrats, a political tactic, perhaps a very successful one. but is that really a tactical retreat? >> i don't think so at all, chuck. and i was curious to hear steny's comments about this being a gimmick. 86 democrats supported the bill that we had on the floor yesterday, the no budget, no pay, so clearly they didn't think it was a gimmick. this was a bipartisan effort. look, if you look at the goal, we've got to get our fiscal house in order, we've got to balance the budget, and in order to do that, the senate actually has to produce a budget, which they haven't done in nearly four years. the house has had budgets for each of the last two years that actually get to balance. so what we did, in this bill, is to say to the senate, look, you've got to do a budget. families do budgets, businesses do budgets, employers do budgets. the senate has not done a budget in nearly four years, so this is the challenge for t
wasserman schultz and she tells us the bill wasn't a clean debt ceiling increase and only prolongs economic uncertainty. it only extents it for a few months so she's right about that. >>> in the last 48 hours or so, u.s. cargo planes made at least five trips into mali transporting about 80 french troops and more than 124 tons of supplies. a spokesman for the u.s./africa command tells us the airlifts began monday, are going to go on for several more days. i couldn't help but notice this on the front page of yahoo! earlier today, the poll today asking you, should the united states intervene in mali. the latest results. so a majority of people say no. >>> the faa still hasn't determined what's causing electrical problems on boeing 787 dreamliner, telling reporters they're still evaluating the idea. the national transportation safety board, meanwhile, says the battery pulled from a dream liner showed signs of thermal damage. ntsb's michael boyd tells us he's never seen an investigation like this. where the faa says a plane is safe and then grounds it. he says the faa has egg all over its face.
to the show as always. >> thank you, larry. >> we dodged a bullet, got the debt ceiling suspended for three months until may 19th. how about this no budget/no pay. is that going to work in the senate? >> larry, i think it should. it's been almost four years since the democrat-controlled senate has done a budget and it's just irresponsible for our country. i serve on the senate budget committee and i can tell you the two years i've been here it's the most disappointing this evening that they've not marked up a budget. harry reid said it would be foolish to do a budget. i think they're changing their mind. how are we ever going to get control of the $16 billion in debt if we don't do a fiscal blueprint for the country? i'm glad also the house said they will do a budget that balances within ten years. >> well, good luck on that, good luck on that. let me ask you something else. another important date is march 1st. that is the automatic across the board spending sequester. senator ayotte, will that thing go through? it doesn't require a vote. it is the law. it says you do nothing, the whole seq
consistently said he'd refuse to negotiate around the debt ceiling. his strategy is vindicated now that the republicans have backed off their threats to take the nation into a default. the president stared down the republicans. they blinked. >> ifill: congress still faces other fiscal fights. automatic spending cuts are due to kick in on march first, and funding for the government runs out march 27. so, can the republican party use fiscal issues to regain its footing? for more on the political fights ahead we turn to susan page, washington bureau chief for "u.s.a. today." and stuart rothenberg of the "rothenberg political report" and "roll call." chuck schumer just said the republicans brinked. did they blink, susan, and does it matter if they did? >> i think a big recalbraigz on their part. they find themselves on the defensive when it comes to the debt ceiling issue. remember how they vowed they would only raise the debt ceiling by a dollar for every dollar cut in spending. now they said never mind. we'll push that down the road. the big fight will be on the sweeping spending cut
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)